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Bronze Statues

Bronze statues from the "What Does It Mean To Be Human?" exhibit.

  • Bronze sculpture of Homo erectus, female, side view

    "Eating Meat"  This female Homo erectus butchered animals using simple stone tools. Bronze artist:  John Gurche

  • Bronze statue of Homo neanderthalensis mother and child.

    "Learning to Survive" With an awl, a female Neanderthal pokes holes in an animal hide while her child watches. Bronze artist: John Gurche.

  • Bronze statue of Homo neanderthalensis mother and child.

    "Learning to Survive"  Like a modern human child, the curious two-year old Homo neanderthalensis learns as he watches.

  • Bronze sculpture of Homo erectus, face view

    "Eating Meat"  The antelope will provide nutritious meat and marrow for this Homo erectus female and her social group.

  • Bronze sculpture of Homo heidelbergensis, face view

    "Gather around the Fire"  Homo heidelbergensis controlled fire and built shelters. Bronze artist: John Gurche.

  • Bronze sculpture of Homo heidelbergensis, side view

    "Gather around the Fire"  This male Homo heidelbergensis lived in a social group that hunted animals and shared food with each other.

  • Bronze statue of male Paranthropus boisei.

    "Finding Food"  In East Africa, a male Paranthropus boisei tugs at root. Bronze artist:  John Gurche.

  •  "Finding Food"  In East Africa, a male Paranthropus boisei tugs at root. Bronze artist:  John Gurche.

  • Bronze statue of <i>Homo floresiensis<i> female.

    "Danger!" This Homo floresiensis female covers her face with her hands as if fending off danger. Bronze artist:  John Gurche.

  • Bronze statue of female Homo floresiensis.

    "Danger!"  Just 17,000 years ago, Homo floresiensis struggled for survival on a small Indonesian island. Bronze artist: John Gurche